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Annotation The Alloy of Law Chapter Ten


Here is the first batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations! Also, please note that there are not yet annotations for the prologue or first chapter.

The Carriage Ride to the Forge

Note that Wayne sleeping here is a side effect of him getting really sickly for a short time, trying to recover a bit of healing power. Marasi thinks he’s just relaxed, which . . . well, he kind of is, but he wouldn’t be sleeping right now save for the effects of his Feruchemy.

As another side note, the city really is as miraculous as Marasi thinks to herself. Sazed created an Eden-esque little section of land here, a place of extreme bounty and fertility, in order to cradle the regrowth of mankind. The actual science (such that it is) of it has to do with the mists bringing fresh water and hugging the ground extra strongly here, as well as some molds that refertilize the ground.

Marewill flowers are named after Kelsier’s wife. (Spook, the Lord Mistborn, came up with the name—as well as naming a lot of the things that held out until this time, such as the months of the year.) The other little worldbuilding item of note here is the idea of what Wayne calls the “God Beyond,” which is an idea that has begun to creep into society, the idea that there is a greater God of the universe beyond people like Harmony or Kelsier. It’s somewhat analogous to some of the Gnostic beliefs in early Christianity.

Wayne’s Backstory

This was the final piece of figuring out who Wayne was. When I’d toyed with him as a character in the original short story, I’d intended for there to be something like this in his past. In the case of this book, however, I didn’t decide upon it until I was quite a ways into the story.

I’ve mentioned that when it comes to characters, I often “discovery write” who they are. Meaning, I work my way into them as I write. With plots and settings, I tend to do a lot of planning and know pretty much where I’m going from the beginning. But with characters, I do a lot of exploring. If a book isn’t going well for me, it’s often because I can’t get the characters down the right way.

That stated, one might wonder why I don’t just plan them out like I do my plots and settings. It’s because it doesn’t really work for me to do it that way—the characters don’t stick to the plan in the same way that plots do. I’ve found that I need this element of improvisation in my writing to give it authenticity. The characters have to breathe in a way that the plots don’t need to, for me. I have to let them be more real, in a way, though I’m not certain if it’s possible to explain this process.

Anyway, my instincts said there had to be something in Wayne’s past like this, and I had felt for a few chapters it had to do with why he didn’t use guns. But until I wrote this chapter, I hadn’t settled on how it was actually going to have played out.


|   Castellano