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Annotation The Alloy of Law Chapter Fifteen


Here is the second batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations!

Miles talks with Suit, gets two minders, then burns gold to see two versions of himself

One curiosity of dealing only with Mistings, rather than full Mistborn, was what to do with the less powerful metals. Certainly a Pewterarm or a Tineye can be useful. We’ve seen them in the series do plenty of interesting things.

But what about a person who can burn only gold? I think there’s just one place in the entire first trilogy where someone does it, the time Vin burns it in the first book. (I may have put a second time in; I don’t recall.) Gold, as a power, was placed into the schematics to give a clue as to what the Eleveth Metal was. Beyond that, I wanted some of the powers of Allomancy to be more metaphysical, more thoughtful, and less about combat.

I’d already decided that Miles would be a Gold Compounder, capable of the Lord Ruler’s healing. That meant he had to be a gold Misting. What would one do, with this power? Ignore it? Was there a way to use it? His nature as a gold Misting is a large part of why Miles is such a thoughtful, introspective person. He is not a good man, but he is a self-reflecting one.

There’s more going on here, of course. Pay attention to the name he mentions: Trell. This is one of the gods from the ancient religions Sazed talked about. You might think that the spikes in Miles will let Sazed influence him directly, and they would—except that Sazed has taken a complete “free will is needed” perspective on life. He won’t let himself take control of people directly unless they’ve “given themselves” to him, as most of the kandra have at this point. Even then, he usually only nudges.

But there is something odd going on with Miles.

Wax and Marasi talk in Ranette’s house

There’s a tiny bit of sexual tension between the two of them. It’s not supposed to be very strong, as Lessie’s death hovers over Wax like a shadow. He’s not really looking for romance, and I didn’t want to push the book too much in that direction.

I’m assuming that people will pick up on Marasi as a romantic interest from the get-go. And, of course, I therefore hope that they find themselves a little bit upended when Wax stubbornly ignores, or resists, the story cues that he’s supposed to be falling for Marasi. Because so far, he’s really not. Though who she is looks good on paper for him, it’s just not right, and he knows it. Sometimes in real life, you put two people together and they start dating. They seem perfect for one another, but for some reason there’s nothing there.

Part of it is the hero worship that Marasi has. He can sense it, and that makes him uncomfortable. He worries that she’s interested in him merely because she has read so much about Wax the lawkeeper. Unfortunately, he’s right. She doesn’t know him. She could fall for the real him—and she’s in the process of doing that—but from his perspective there’s still something wrong with this relationship. Too many things wrong, I should say.

An interesting note here is that my editor took great effort in this scene (for some reason) to shorten “Waxillium” each time it was mentioned to simply “Wax.” I didn’t catch what he’d done until the copyedit. That was utterly wrong, because this is Wax’s viewpoint. And in his head, he now sees himself as Waxillium, and not just Wax. If you never noticed it, read through the book again and pay attention to when he calls himself Waxillium and when he calls himself Wax. It’s done very deliberately. [Assistant Peter’s note: What name other characters use for Wax when talking to or thinking about him is something to pay attention to throughout this series.]


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