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Annotation The Alloy of Law Chapter Eleven


Here is the second batch of annotations for The Alloy of Law. As with all of the other annotations here on the site, each annotation contains spoilers for the current chapter. Spoilers for chapters after the current one are hidden by spoiler tags. We recommend you read the book before reading the annotations!

First Miles Viewpoint

Dan, from my writing group, thinks that this Miles scene is misplaced, and thinks I should have held off from putting one in for a few more chapters. (He thinks the second one is better placed.) Dan usually has a good eye for these sorts of things, so I’ll admit I’m not a hundred percent sure that I like this scene being here.

However, that said, in the draft that Dan read, Wax wasn’t sure it was Miles until he saw the cigar box. Even then, there was a question. I decided, because of feedback, that wasn’t terribly realistic. Wax would have recognized the voice well enough from the start to begin suspecting Miles, so keeping that suspicion from the reader lacked authenticity. For that reason, in a later draft I revised so that Miles’ name is mentioned in the first chapter where Wax starts suspecting him.

Miles is the most erratic character in this book, personality-wise. He’s an interesting guy on several fronts, but I worry he’s got too much going on in that head of his to present a compelling bad guy. He’s got a lot of different motives, and he’s not certain about many of them. We will see how the reaction to him is; I acknowledge that he’s no Zane, however. That’s probably a good thing . . .

It may sound like I’m dissatisfied with Miles, but I’m not. I just happen to like what he does to Wax more than I think Miles himself is compelling as a villan. I’m pleased with his role in the book.

Marasi is an Allomancer

One of my big goals in these post-epic Mistborn books is to give a chance for more limited-power people (Mistings and their Feruchemical cousins, Ferrings) a chance to shine. In the previous trilogy, the focus really was on the Mistborn. Vin and Kelsier fit the epic fantasy mindset I wanted—powerful in an epic sort of way, broadly capable with abilities in a lot of areas.

For these books, I wanted to show people who had one or two powers, instead of sixteen, and show how specialization can achieve some incredible results. Because of that, I intentionally held back in the first trilogy in letting Vin do a few things. (Note how much better Zane was with minute steelpushes and ironpulls than she was.) Vin was incredibly skilled, but because she had so many powers to work with, she didn’t home in as much on any one of them. Things like Wax’s steel bubble are tricks I wanted to save for people like Wax. (He’s what we’d call in the Mistborn world a steel savant, so capable with his metal—and having burned it so long, for so many years—that he’s got an instinctive ability with it that lets him be very precice.)

And so we come to Marasi, who has the power opposite—but paired with—Wayne’s ability. Both she and Wayne have powers I wanted to delve into. Indeed, I kind of promised that the last metals would get highlighted in these newer books. Matching that, I’ve given Miles the same power the Lord Ruler used to heal himself from so many incredible wounds. I wanted to explore more of what this skill was capable of when not overshadowed by so many other powers and abilites.


|   Castellano