Current Projects
Stormlight 4 & 5 outlining
88 %
Starsight (Skyward 2) 5th draft
100 %
Stormlight 4 rough draft
48 %
MTG: Children of the Nameless release
100 %

Annotation Mistborn 3 Chapter Fifty-Seven


Vin Wonders If She’s Mad

I love Vin’s paragraph on deciding if she’s mad or not. Zane spent his entire adult life debating this issue, trying to determine whether he was really insane or not and trying to figure out how much of the world around him was a fabrication of his broken mind. Vin? She gives herself a couple of seconds to consider, realizes that if she’s mad, there’s no way to know, and decides the line of reasoning is useless.

On occasion Vin complains that she’s a creature of instinct and not logic—but that’s not the right way to put it. She’s very logical—far more so than most scholars, I’d say. She just doesn’t like to dwell on things and debate them. Present facts to her, and she’ll accept them.

In a way, she’s literal and concrete—which are the most basic of logical philosophies, I’d say. Elend is abstract. He likes to consider and rationalize. Think around problems, rather than face them head on. But he’s logical too.

Perhaps their love of hard facts is part of what draws them together.

Vin Asks Ruin about Preservation

After this scene, perhaps you can see why I wanted so badly to spend some time with Vin and Ruin talking while she was imprisoned. I felt this was important enough that I was willing to stretch plausibility a tad to make it possible. (The spoiler in the chapter 54 annotation explains what I mean by that.)

The discussion of morality here is an important one, as I wanted Ruin and Preservation to represent forces, not moral poles. This is vital for various reasons in the underlying cosmology. If they represented poles, then that implied there could only be two like them. But, as they represent opposites, that leaves more room.

Preservation did betray Ruin. This brings us onto the shaky ground of the morality of lying to achieve a greater good. If as much were at stake as is here—the end of an entire world—then perhaps you’d betray someone too. (I love fantasy. Where else can you talk about the end of the world as a consequence of a betrayal and have it be literal?)

Ruin’s consciousness—separate from his power—isn’t a particularly nice being. But you can’t much blame him, as there’s very little that is left of the mind that once was. The force of Ruin has pretty well molded the mind to fit with the force’s intent.


|   Castellano