Current Projects
Stormlight 4 & 5 outlining
40 %
Starsight (Skyward 2) 3rd draft
100 %
Skyward release
100 %
MTG: Children of the Nameless release
100 %

Annotation Elantris Chapter 33


Chapter Thirty-Three (No Hidden Spoilers)

Another short, but powerful, Hrathen chapter. This is the head of Hrathen’s character climax for the first half of the book. He has been questioning his own faith ever since he first met Dilaf. It isn’t that he questions the truthfulness of the Derethi religion–he just has become uncertain of his own place within it. I wanted this moment, when he’s semi-consciously watching the eclipse, to be the moment where he finally decides upon an answer within himself.

This is a major turning-point for Hrathen. His part in the book pivots on this chapter, and the things he does later are greatly influenced by the decisions he makes here. I think the important realization he realizes here is that not every person’s faith manifests in the same way. He’s different from other people, and he worships differently. That doesn’t make his faith inferior.

In fact, I think his faith is actually superior to Dilaf’s. Hrathen has considered, weighed, and decided. That gives him more validity as a teacher, I think. In fact, he fits into the Derethi religion quite well–the entire Derethi idea was conceived as a logical movement.

When I was designing this book, I knew I wanted a religious antagonist. Actually, the idea for the Derethi religion was one of the very fist conceptual seeds for this novel. I’ve always been curious about the relationship between the Catholic church and the Roman empire. While Rome itself has declined greatly in power, the church that grew within it–almost as a side-effect–has become one of the dominant forces in the world. I wondered what would happen if an empire decided to do something like this intentionally.

The early Derethi leaders, then, were a group who realized the problems with the Old Fjordell Empire. It collapsed upon itself because of bureaucratic problems. The Old Empire was faced with rebellions and wars, and never managed to become stable. The Derethi founders realized the power of religion. They decided that if they could get the nations of the East to believe in a single religion–with that religion centered in Fjorden–they would have power equal to, or even greater than, the power of the Old Empire. At the same time, they wouldn’t have to worry about rebellion–or even bureaucracy. The people of the other nations would govern themselves, but would give devotion, loyalty, and money to Fjorden.

So, these men appropriated the teachings of Shu-Dereth and mixed them with some mythology from the Fjordell Old Empire. The resulting hybridization, added to the Fjordell martial work ethic, created an aggressive, intense religion–yet one that was ‘constructed’ with a logical purpose in mind. The Fjordell priests spent the next few centuries converting and building their power base. The result was the New Empire–an empire without governments or armies, yet far more powerful than the Old Empire ever was.


|   Castellano